How to help rescued wallabies in Australia

Fancy a trip of a lifetime to sun-soaked Queensland, Australia to work with cuddly wallabies and wombats all day? These Aussie superstars need your help – guest blogger Claire Herbaux, of NGO Frontier, tells us how you could be enjoying a wild life in the sunshine state…

Bridle Boys
Bridle Boys

Kangeroos and wallabies, an iconic site for visitors to Australia, are often a nuisance – a pest even – to locals. The law may protect them but many marsupials get injured or killed as it’s easy to obtain a permit to shoot those that damage land.

Between bad shots and road accidents, many wallabies end up in rescue centres including young joeys left in their mother’s pouch after she dies. Frontier runs the Australia Wallaby Rescue project at an animal sanctuary in Gladstone, Queensland, that takes care of injured animals. The sanctuary helps hand-rear joeys that have lost their mothers, as well as running wombat breeding programme. Koalas and other wildlife are also cared for.

Australian possum
Australian possum

Life as a volunteer on the project

On the project, everything depends on the season and every day is different. You may be working with rescued joeys, helping the wombat breeding programme, getting animals ready to be released back into the wild, or preparing the sanctuary for school visits. General activities include maintaining the animals’ living quarters, food prep and feeding, and building new facilities.

In the hot Queensland weather, the day starts early to avoid the heat and lunch time is spent relaxing and taking in outback life.

Bridled Nailtail Wallaby, picture Phil Cole, Scotia National Park
Bridled Nailtail Wallaby, picture Phil Cole, Scotia National Park

Accommodation

The rescue centre has volunteer accommodation on site which includes laundry and cooking facilities. It is a home environment and rooms are usually shared with another volunteer. The next city is a little way away but food is provided. Volunteers prepare their own breakfast and lunch, with everyone eating together in the evening with a meal prepared by the host.

Recommended for… Anyone wanting to experience life in the Australian outback and get up close to native animals.

Be aware that… The sanctuary is not in the vicinity of any towns – you won’t be going out to the pub, but will spend relaxing time with the host family and other volunteers.

Prices start at £799 for two weeks (excluding flights) with extra weeks available. For more information, including a full programme, departure dates and bookings, visit www.frontier.ac.uk

Bridles feedout
Bridles feedout

About the author: Claire Herbaux is an Online Journalism Intern at Frontier, an international non-profit volunteering NGO. Check out Frontier’s blog Into the Wild for more gap year ideas to help make your time out meaningful. For more information about travel and volunteering opportunities available please visit www.frontier.ac.uk.

World’s 10 most extraordinary places to stay

Ever wanted to spend the night in a lighthouse in New York state? A treehouse in Laos? Or a cave hotel in Turkey? These are just three of the 10 most extraordinary places to stay in the world – according to travel experts Lonely Planet.

To accompany the launch of their first ever collection of world’s best hotels, Lonely Planet has revealed its top 10 list of unusual accommodation choices. We reported the Lonely Planet ‘eco accommodation’ list last week and now pick out some of the Goodtrippers-friendly options on the ‘extraordinary’ list: here are our picks…

Planet Baobab, Gweta, BotswanaPlanet Baobab, Gweta, Botswana

Second in Lonely Planet’s list, this funky lodge is a must if you’re visiting Botswana’s Makgadikgadi Salt Pans. You can choose to stay in a traditional mud hut (en-suite and adorned with art made with the natural pigments found in the many termite mounds in the area), or a traditional grass hut (en-suite and constructed using the same methods as the original bushmen of Botswana). If you fancy it, camping facilities are also on offer. Walkways wind through the baobabs (which are lit up at night) to a pool and bar-restaurant. Spot meerkats and elephants while you sip your sundowner…

 

Peppers Cradle Mountain Lodge, AustraliaPeppers Cradle Mountain Lodge, Tasmania, Australia

No. 5 in the Lonely Planet list, this eco-friendly lodge is located on the edge of the spectacular World Heritage site Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park. Cabins are nestled privately in the bushland, with wallabies bounding past the windows and wombats shuffling amid the trees. Locally sourced game, wine, cheeses and honey permeate the restaurant’s menu, one of Tasmania’s best. The view from the spa is a dense thicket of King Billy pine trees. Guests can choose from couples’ or family cabins, right up to suites with private outdoor tubs and fuel-efficient fireplaces.

 

Free Spirit Spheres, British Columbia, CanadaFree Spirit Spheres, British Columbia, Canada

Treehouses for grown-ups! These fantastic handmade orbs, suspended among the tall trees of west coast rainforest, are kitted out like cosy boat cabins inside (mod cons including iPod docks all present and correct) and are accessed by rope walkways and spiral ladders. You’re encouraged spend time in your swaying sphere to immerse yourself in the local wildlife – the chattering birds and squirrels, now on your eye-level. The site also has showers, a sauna, kitchen and barbecue.

 

Thonga Beach Lodge, iSimangaliso Wetland Park, South AfricaThonga Beach Lodge, South Africa

This luxury resort by the beach is environmentally-friendly and remote – it’s one of few such lodges within the 328,000 hectare iSimangaliso Wetland Park, a UNESCO World Heritage site. Its spacious huts are scattered through dune forest, some with spectacular views of the Indian Ocean. Whales frequently pass by, and Loggerhead and Leatherback turtles nest on the nearby beaches. Take a nature trek with a local expert, a deep sea dive, or simply relax in the spa or indulge in the lodge’s fresh seafood and salads.

 

The Gibbon Experience Treehouse, Bokeo Reserve, LaosThe Gibbon Experience Treehouse, Bokeo Reserve, Laos

Completing the Lonely Planet top 10 is this outstanding experience in Laos. Imagine waking to the sonorous call of the endangered black-crested gibbon, stretching in your bed a hundred feet up in the triple canopy, and nursing a coffee on your balcony as you watch the dawn mist crowd in over the jungle valley below. The tree houses, erected by conservation group Animo, are a thing of wonder straddling the giant trunks of strangler fig trees. You have to take a zip wire to ‘fly’ into your night’s accommodation! Dinner is delivered fresh from the nearby campfire, and music is the ambient sound of cicadas as fireflies dance in the night air.

 

The full Lonely Planet Top 10 Extraordinary Places to Stay

  1. Mihir Gahr, Rajasthan, India
  2. Planet Baobab, Gweta, Botswana
  3. Prendiparte B&B, Bologna, Italy
  4. Qasr Al Sarab, UAE
  5. Peppers Cradle Mountain Lodge, Tasmania, Australia
  6. Free Spirit Spheres, British Columbia, Canada
  7. Taskonak Hotel, Goreme, Cappadocia, Turkey
  8. Thonga Beach Lodge, iSimangaliso Wetland Park, South Africa
  9. Saugerties Lighthouse, New York state, USA
  10. The Gibbon Experience Treehouse, Bokeo Reserve, Laos

 

You may also be interested in the Lonely Planet’s top 10 eco stays

 

Tasmania’s Saffire Freycinet resort – dedicated to ecotourism

Guest blogger Sarah Boisvert profiles a luxury eco resort in Tasmania, Australia

When rain and fog took their toll on my psyche during my Cambridge days, I found my thoughts turning to someplace warm and beautiful. It’s trendy now for many wild, scenic areas to claim to be ecotourism sites, but for me, it’s important to be sure the resort really is environmentally-friendly and has put in place properly green measures to ensure sustainability. Here’s the scoop on one venue that meets my high standards for eco travel.

the resort location (pic courtesy of Saffire Freycinet)

Tasmania, southeast of the Australian coast, is a series of islands that has a temperate maritime climate, so there are rarely vast extremes in temperature. The Saffire Freycinet resort located at Coles Bay is not just a nature resort in a spectacular setting. As early as 1929, the original site was used as a caravan park and backpackers hostel, resulting in considerable erosion of the landscape. The award-winning facility works to restore the area to its natural splendor and is in the process of replanting over 30,000 native species to encourage revitalization of the land. This commitment to restoring the eco-system to its natural state is part of the resort’s core principles.

Accommodation

Everywhere on Saffire Freycinet, architects used natural local products such as sustainably harvested wood and beautiful stone. Colours reflect the hues found in the surroundings, including the gemstones mined here. Building designs appear to bring nature indoors and take advantage of external elements. While the well-appointed Luxury Suites and Signature Suites with their view of Great Oyster Bay are a beautiful way to enjoy the resort, the Private Pavilions provide an added level of privacy. Personal meal preparation by your own private chef can be arranged in your ensuite kitchen, and the Pavilion’s courtyard boasts a personal plunge pool.

Activities – outdoor fun, meditation and spa indulgence

accommodation at the resort (pic courtesy of Saffire Freycinet)Resort Spa – The world-class spa is a testament to the creative use of natural local products. Unique treatments draw from the healing powers of local sapphires that range in color from blue to green to yellow. Yoga mats are provided in each suite, and meditation classes are also available.

Outdoor Fun – Complimentary in your Saffire Freycinet experience are guided tours that range from walks in the spectacular Freycinet National Park with commentary to visits to a local winery or oyster farm. The resort also has its own private archery range with trained instructors. Also, there are kayaks, mountain bikes, kites and other sources of entertainment for the entire family.

Signature experiences let you explore the surrounding area more extensively. There are trips aboard the resort’s especially designed boat, Saffire, with fishing or stops at beaches, as well as exciting tours on Quad Bikes on four-wheel-drive tracks. 

Whether you want to relax in your Pavilion or get your heart pumping both from physical activity and the beauty of the landscape, there’s something for everyone’s taste.

Food

Menus, which change daily at the Saffire Freycinet resort, begin with homegrown produce and local ingredients. Classically trained Executive Chef Hugh Whitehouse says, “In the kitchen, I use premium local ingredients sourced from an established network of Tasmanian and specifically East Coast growers. I believe that showcasing the best of the season allows us to offer a more balanced and textured dining experience.”

At the end of the day, the Saffire Freycinet resort is an eco-friendly destination that takes its mission seriously while offering a 5-star holiday experience.

Recommended for… Travellers looking for a luxurious accommodation; there are plenty of activities for an active family, although the privacy aspect lends itself well to honeymooners or romantic interludes.

Be aware that… It is a high-end resort so add-ons are dear

‘Good’ credentials:

  • Commitment to restoring natural ecosystem of surrounding area
  • Use of sustainably harvest wood and local materials
  • Meals use homegrown or locally-sourced produce
  • Low impact activities on offer making the most of the natural environment

For more information and booking visit www.saffire-freycinet.com.au

About the author: Sarah Boisvert has travelled the world over, as evidenced by her two million frequent flier miles. She has resided in both the British and American university cities of Cambridge and misses English delicacies such as Spotted Dick. And she is always sure to check the online reputation of a resort before she stays there.

[google-map-v3 width=”550″ height=”350″ zoom=”12″ maptype=”roadmap” mapalign=”center” directionhint=”false” language=”default” poweredby=”false” maptypecontrol=”true” pancontrol=”true” zoomcontrol=”true” scalecontrol=”true” streetviewcontrol=”true” scrollwheelcontrol=”false” draggable=”true” tiltfourtyfive=”false” addmarkermashupbubble=”false” addmarkermashupbubble=”false” addmarkerlist=”Hobart, Tasmania{}cabin-2.png{}Saffire Freycinet eco resort” bubbleautopan=”true” showbike=”false” showtraffic=”false” showpanoramio=”false”]

Six of the best romantic eco retreats

What could be more romantic than seclusion, tranquility and being close to nature? Luckily, those qualities are often in abundance when it comes to eco accommodation. From luxury eco resorts to cosy lodges for two, here are six of the best retreats for romantic getaways…

Jean-Michel Cousteau Resort, FijiJean-Michel Cousteau Resort, Fiji

Frequently named as one of the best eco resorts in the world, this Fijian gem is luxurious to the hilt. Dedicated to sustainability, the resort owners respect the beautiful natural surroundings and take advantage of sensitve and traditional Fijian farming principles in its organic garden and surrounding land. Alongside the expected recycling, composting, solar power and water preservation, the resort runs a conservation programme looking after the reef on the edge of the resort, a designated marine reserve.

Romance factor: 25 individual bures (Fijian bungalows) are set in 17 acres of old coconut plantation – and each offer lots of South Pacific style. Go for the Honeymoon Point Reef Bure with its private hot tub overlooking the ocean. If you want to really ramp up the romance factor, you can book a day’s stay on the resort’s private island – packed off with a champagne picnic it’s the ultimate paradise for two!

Visit: www.fijiresort.com

Ecopod Boutique Retreat, Scotland

Ecopod, ScotlandThe first of its kind in the UK, the new Ecopod Boutique Retreat is luxury self-catering in a modern geodesic dome, and a fantastic piece of low-carbon living. The pod, built with sustainable timber and minimal concrete, blends into the surrounding birch trees in this beautiful part of west Scotland. Heating is provided by a highly-efficient wood pellet stove; fresh water comes from a hill stream filtering through the forest; waste water is treated with the Biorock system; and the pod is equipped with energy-efficient appliances and locally-sourced produce and toiletries. Guests are offered a 10% discount if they arrive by train or bicycle.

Romance factor: The light-filled dome offers spectacular views of Castle Stalker (which appeared in the film Monty Python and the Holy Grail!) and Loch Linnhe. The interiors are uber-stylish (think 1970s Eames chairs and other durable design classics); and the wood burner adds extra cosiness.

Visit: www.domesweetdome.co.uk

Boroka Downs, Australia

Boroka Downs offers secluded luxury in the majestic Grampians. As a nature based retreat it has been designed, built and is operated with environmental sustainability at its heart. The modern individual residences are low carbon – double-glazed, fully insulated, run on solar power, and each with their own rain water tank. Recycling takes place throughout and free range chickens take care of food scraps. Around 15,000 native trees and shrubs have been planted on the site in the past five years.

Romance factor: They promise seclusion and discretion throughout your stay… The bungalows are kitted out with all the latest mod cons plus sleek and stylish handmade furniture. You can relax in your private spa while enjoying the view through your glass walls. For serious romantics, Boroka Downs also offer ‘Elopement Packages’!

Visit: www.borokadowns.com.au

Golden Buddha Beach Resort, Thailandsunset on Koh Phra Thong, Thailand

Arriving by long boat you’re bound to be greeted by smiles from the friendly staff of Golden Buddha Beach Resort. Everyone will make you feel welcome on this island, but you’ll have plenty of opportunities for time alone. The luxury beach bungalows, all with a sea view, were built using sustainable materials with sensitive land management and minimal energy usage in place throughout the resort.

Romance factor: You can fall asleep to the sounds of the local wildlife and nearby waves if you keep your bedroom wall open (but still enjoy privacy as each bungalow is placed well away from neighbours). Excellent, freshly prepared local food can be enjoyed in the candle-lit restaurant every night.

Visit: www.goldenbuddharesort.com or read our full review here

Kanopi House, Jamaica

The resort owners know how to marry laid-back Jamaican style with environmentally-friendly tourism. Eco-friendly, low impact, organic, and green: Kanopi House treads gently upon the earth. The resort operates a ‘grey water’ system, processed along a lined reed bed, and uses sustainable, regionally sourced hardwoods.  Furnishings, decor and artworks are produced from renewable Jamaican materials, and designed and handcrafted by local artisans.

Romance factor: You can gaze at the Caribbean sea from your chic tree house, before taking a stroll through a jungle of Banyan trees and flowering ginger lily down to a secluded, white sand cove. The resort’s private shoreline and coral reef is a haven for purple manta rays.

Visit: www.kanopihouse.com

Hotelito Desconocido, MexicoHotelido Desconodio

The rooms, restaurants and facilities of this paradise getaway are surrounded by more than 60km of white sandy beaches, a lagoon, crystal clear waterways, gardens, palm trees and fruit trees. In this magical setting, declared by UNESCO aquifer paradise for birds, live pelicans, herons, frigates and hundreds of species of animals that the resort is helping to preserve.

Romance factor: Enjoy delicious organic food in the restaurant, relax with specialised treatments in the spa, sunbathe on the beach, or take a boat for two out onto the lagoon to spot local wildlife. They also specialise in those fantasy-style beach weddings…

 

 

 

[google-map-v3 width=”750″ height=”200″ zoom=”12″ maptype=”roadmap” mapalign=”center” directionhint=”false” language=”default” poweredby=”false” maptypecontrol=”true” pancontrol=”true” zoomcontrol=”true” scalecontrol=”true” streetviewcontrol=”true” scrollwheelcontrol=”false” draggable=”true” tiltfourtyfive=”false” addmarkermashupbubble=”false” addmarkermashupbubble=”false” addmarkerlist=”Savusavu, Fiji{}cabin-2.png{}Jean-Michel Cousteau Resort, Fiji” bubbleautopan=”true” showbike=”false” showtraffic=”false” showpanoramio=”false”]
[google-map-v3 width=”750″ height=”200″ zoom=”12″ maptype=”roadmap” mapalign=”center” directionhint=”false” language=”default” poweredby=”false” maptypecontrol=”true” pancontrol=”true” zoomcontrol=”true” scalecontrol=”true” streetviewcontrol=”true” scrollwheelcontrol=”false” draggable=”true” tiltfourtyfive=”false” addmarkermashupbubble=”false” addmarkermashupbubble=”false” addmarkerlist=”PA38 4BL{}cabin-2.png{}Ecopod, Argyll” bubbleautopan=”true” showbike=”false” showtraffic=”false” showpanoramio=”false”]
[google-map-v3 width=”750″ height=”200″ zoom=”12″ maptype=”roadmap” mapalign=”center” directionhint=”false” language=”default” poweredby=”false” maptypecontrol=”true” pancontrol=”true” zoomcontrol=”true” scalecontrol=”true” streetviewcontrol=”true” scrollwheelcontrol=”false” draggable=”true” tiltfourtyfive=”false” addmarkermashupbubble=”false” addmarkermashupbubble=”false” addmarkerlist=”HALLS GAP, VICTORIA, 3381{}cabin-2.png{}Bokora Downs, Grampians, Australia” bubbleautopan=”true” showbike=”false” showtraffic=”false” showpanoramio=”false”]

[google-map-v3 width=”750″ height=”200″ zoom=”12″ maptype=”roadmap” mapalign=”center” directionhint=”false” language=”default” poweredby=”false” maptypecontrol=”true” pancontrol=”true” zoomcontrol=”true” scalecontrol=”true” streetviewcontrol=”true” scrollwheelcontrol=”false” draggable=”true” tiltfourtyfive=”false” addmarkermashupbubble=”false” addmarkermashupbubble=”false” addmarkerlist=”Port Antonio, Jamaica{}cabin-2.png{}Kanopi House, Jamaica” bubbleautopan=”true” showbike=”false” showtraffic=”false” showpanoramio=”false”]
[google-map-v3 width=”750″ height=”200″ zoom=”12″ maptype=”roadmap” mapalign=”center” directionhint=”false” language=”default” poweredby=”false” maptypecontrol=”true” pancontrol=”true” zoomcontrol=”true” scalecontrol=”true” streetviewcontrol=”true” scrollwheelcontrol=”false” draggable=”true” tiltfourtyfive=”false” addmarkermashupbubble=”false” addmarkermashupbubble=”false” addmarkerlist=”La Cruz de Loreto Tomatlán, Jalisco, México{}cabin-2.png{}Hotelito Desconocido, Mexico” bubbleautopan=”true” showbike=”false” showtraffic=”false” showpanoramio=”false”]

A Beginner’s Guide to Eco Stays

(This article was originally published in Ethics Girls magazine)

A decade ago, the concept of eco-friendly travel was, in many people’s minds, limited only to camping – roughing it under canvas whilst chopping your own firewood, communing with nature and truly ‘getting away from it all’. That will never lose its appeal for many, but 21st century ‘eco accommodation’ comes in many more guises.

[gdl_gallery title=”Eco stays” width=”125″ height=”110″ ]

From glampsites to luxury resorts, we are now spoilt for choice when it comes to eco (or green/sustainable/responsible – call it what you will!) places to stay on holiday. Here’s the Goodtrippers guide to selecting the right eco stay for you…

The Luxury Eco Resort: For those who love some indulgence on holiday… Usually found somewhere exotic like Thailand or Australia, luxury eco resorts offer beautiful rooms plus high-end facilities and services (massages, spas, room service) but are run on renewable energy, built from sustainable materials, and employ local people on good wages. Try Longitude 131 an award-winning eco-sensitive resort in the Australian outback near Ayres Rock run entirely on solar energy; or Golden Buddha Beach Resort on the Andaman Coast of Thailand which is built from sustainable materials, minimises power usage and provides good jobs for local people.

The Eco ‘Lodge’: Without the ‘bling’ of a luxury eco resort, the eco lodge is no less special. Often more rustic, an eco lodge could consist of a collection of separate ‘bungalows’ or huts in a style unique to its location – whether that be jungle, snowy mountain range, beach or lakeside. For outdoors enthusiasts, eco-conscious Nimmo Bay Wilderness Resort in British Columbia, Canada, offers six cosy cabins situated lakeside; or Our Jungle House in Thailand is an eco-friendly cluster of romantic treehouses.

The Ethical Hotel: Many hotels around the world boast environmental standards (reducing, recycling and reusing where possible) but some are going the extra mile to do something above and beyond what the average person would do at home. Bardessono is a LEED platinum-certified hotel in California’s Napa Valley, with a tonne of energy-saving technology, sustainable materials and recycling plans for a high-tech green stay; or try the 4-star Lancaster Hotel in London with its strong environmental and community policies, and its own Rooftop Honey Farm!

The Sustainable B&B: Cosier and more down-to-earth than your grand hotel, a sustainable ‘bed and breakfast’ will often keep it local with its own kitchen garden produce, handmade organic toiletries and low energy usage. One of only four officially certified organic B&Bs in the UK, the Orchard Farmhouse Organic B&B in the Dorset countryside offers an exclusively organic breakfast amongst the peace, quiet and picturesque views; for a chic city B&B The Zetter Townhouse in London sources water from its own borehole and uses eco-friendly paint throughout.

The Glampsite: If you can’t bear to be without home comforts, a ‘glampsite’ (glamorous camping site) is a million miles away from a leaky tent. Whether it be sleeping under the stars in a glass pod near the Arctic or snoozing under canvas on the African plains, these more unusual choices are hard to beat. Eco-conscious Campi Ya Kanzi in Kenya is a safari dream that is solar-powered and works in partnership with the local Maasai community; the cluster of geodesic domes of EcoCamp in Patagonia is packed with green technology allowing you to fall asleep under the stars; or try the Barefoot Yurts in East Sussex, UK, which are 90% built from reclaimed materials with solar lighting and a composting loo.

[google-map-v3 width=”750″ height=”200″ zoom=”12″ maptype=”roadmap” mapalign=”center” directionhint=”false” language=”default” poweredby=”false” maptypecontrol=”true” pancontrol=”true” zoomcontrol=”true” scalecontrol=”true” streetviewcontrol=”true” scrollwheelcontrol=”false” draggable=”true” tiltfourtyfive=”false” addmarkermashupbubble=”false” addmarkermashupbubble=”false” addmarkerlist=”Ayers Rock, Northern Territory, Australia{}cabin-2.png{}Longitude 131″ bubbleautopan=”true” showbike=”false” showtraffic=”false” showpanoramio=”false”]
[google-map-v3 width=”750″ height=”200″ zoom=”12″ maptype=”roadmap” mapalign=”center” directionhint=”false” language=”default” poweredby=”false” maptypecontrol=”true” pancontrol=”true” zoomcontrol=”true” scalecontrol=”true” streetviewcontrol=”true” scrollwheelcontrol=”false” draggable=”true” tiltfourtyfive=”false” addmarkermashupbubble=”false” addmarkermashupbubble=”false” addmarkerlist=”50.938656, -126.684506{}cabin-2.png{}Nimmo Bay Wilderness Resort” bubbleautopan=”true” showbike=”false” showtraffic=”false” showpanoramio=”false”]
[google-map-v3 width=”750″ height=”200″ zoom=”12″ maptype=”roadmap” mapalign=”center” directionhint=”false” language=”default” poweredby=”false” maptypecontrol=”true” pancontrol=”true” zoomcontrol=”true” scalecontrol=”true” streetviewcontrol=”true” scrollwheelcontrol=”false” draggable=”true” tiltfourtyfive=”false” addmarkermashupbubble=”false” addmarkermashupbubble=”false” addmarkerlist=”Bardessono, 6526 Yount St. Yountville, CA 94599{}cabin-2.png{}Bardessono, California” bubbleautopan=”true” showbike=”false” showtraffic=”false” showpanoramio=”false”]
[google-map-v3 width=”750″ height=”200″ zoom=”12″ maptype=”roadmap” mapalign=”center” directionhint=”false” language=”default” poweredby=”false” maptypecontrol=”true” pancontrol=”true” zoomcontrol=”true” scalecontrol=”true” streetviewcontrol=”true” scrollwheelcontrol=”false” draggable=”true” tiltfourtyfive=”false” addmarkermashupbubble=”false” addmarkermashupbubble=”false” addmarkerlist=”Orchard Farmhouse B and B, Wonston, Dorset, UK{}cabin-2.png{}Orchard Farmhouse Organic B&B” bubbleautopan=”true” showbike=”false” showtraffic=”false” showpanoramio=”false”]
[google-map-v3 width=”750″ height=”200″ zoom=”12″ maptype=”roadmap” mapalign=”center” directionhint=”false” language=”default” poweredby=”false” maptypecontrol=”true” pancontrol=”true” zoomcontrol=”true” scalecontrol=”true” streetviewcontrol=”true” scrollwheelcontrol=”false” draggable=”true” tiltfourtyfive=”false” addmarkermashupbubble=”false” addmarkermashupbubble=”false” addmarkerlist=”Campi Ya Kanzi, Mtito Andei, Kenya{}cabin-2.png{}Campi Ya Kanzi, Kenya” bubbleautopan=”true” showbike=”false” showtraffic=”false” showpanoramio=”false”]
[google-map-v3 width=”750″ height=”200″ zoom=”12″ maptype=”roadmap” mapalign=”center” directionhint=”false” language=”default” poweredby=”false” maptypecontrol=”true” pancontrol=”true” zoomcontrol=”true” scalecontrol=”true” streetviewcontrol=”true” scrollwheelcontrol=”false” draggable=”true” tiltfourtyfive=”false” addmarkermashupbubble=”false” addmarkermashupbubble=”false” addmarkerlist=”Barros Arana 166 Puerto Natales, Décima Segunda Región de Magallanes y La Antártica Chilena, Chile{}cabin-2.png{}EcoCamp Patagonia” bubbleautopan=”true” showbike=”false” showtraffic=”false” showpanoramio=”false”]
[google-map-v3 width=”750″ height=”200″ zoom=”12″ maptype=”roadmap” mapalign=”center” directionhint=”false” language=”default” poweredby=”false” maptypecontrol=”true” pancontrol=”true” zoomcontrol=”true” scalecontrol=”true” streetviewcontrol=”true” scrollwheelcontrol=”false” draggable=”true” tiltfourtyfive=”false” addmarkermashupbubble=”false” addmarkermashupbubble=”false” addmarkerlist=”Stubb Lane, Brede, Nr Rye, E. Sussex, TN31 6BN{}cabin-2.png{}Barefoot Yurts” bubbleautopan=”true” showbike=”false” showtraffic=”false” showpanoramio=”false”]